Bautzen: Hobbyist beekeeping: In Newschwitz, bees are back in fashion


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Bautzen

02/05/2022

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17:00

Hobbyist beekeeping: In Newschwitz, bees are back in fashion

The Neschwitz beekeeping association has existed for 100 years. There is currently no shortage of members. But beekeepers face problems.

By Uwe Menschner


4 minutes

Beekeeping is back in fashion in Neschwitz.  The local history museum of Neschwitz shows that the activity of the beekeeper has evolved over the decades.

Beekeeping is back in fashion in Neschwitz. The local history museum of Neschwitz shows that the activity of the beekeeper has evolved over the decades.
© Symbolic photo: Sebastian Schultz

Neschwitz. Interest in beekeeping is on the rise again. This can be seen, among other things, in the number of members of the beekeeping association Neschwitz. While the association had only ten members after 1990, today 26 beekeepers practice their passion closer to nature.

However, this does not come close to the figures of previous years. In the 1950s, there were sometimes more than 100 beekeepers involved in organized structures in Neschwitz and the surrounding area.

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The Neschwitz beekeeping association has existed for 100 years

“The positive development of recent years corresponds to a generally observable trend”, says Christian Buder, chairman of the Neschwitz beekeepers’ association. “People want to know more about the foods they eat and how they are made. The will to do something good for nature has also grown stronger.

The association itself will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2022 – an anniversary that will be honored with a special exhibition at the local history museum in Neschwitz until July 24. “Many beekeeping associations were created at that time,” explains Christian Buder. An advertisement published in the Sorbian daily in 1922 indicates the existence of the Neschwitz association at that time.

Exhibition at the museum: Development of beekeeping

The special exhibition at the local history museum in Neschwitz gives an idea of ​​how beekeeping has evolved over the decades. According to Christian Buder, two beehives are the most striking pieces. Hives are called beehives until they have been colonized by their busy inhabitants. The two hives on display were originally at Rauschwitz near Elstra; Christian Buder bought them from a local beekeeper.

“The decorations show the importance of beekeeping around 1900”, specifies Christian Buder. The evolution of today’s magazine loot can also be traced. Thanks to this, the beekeeper no longer has to remove each comb individually, which significantly reduces the workload.

Toxic insecticides threaten bees

Even though beekeeping is becoming more and more popular and more and more people enjoy living in harmony with nature, beekeepers still have to deal with major problems, some of which are man-made. “The neonicotinoids currently approved as pesticides are 3,000 to 4,000 times more toxic than the poisons currently banned, such as DDT or lindane,” says Christian Buder.

The Berlin scientist Randolf Menzel has proven this. The insecticide not only poisons the bees, but also enters the food cycle. According to Christian Buder, the other major problems in beekeeping are Varroa mites and American foulbrood.

Humans prevent bee decline

However, the president of the association also underlines that the survival of the bee depends essentially on man: “Without human intervention, without care, it would have the same appearance here as in the whole world of insects, where 75% of Individuals have disappeared over the past 20 years.” Today, for example, far fewer swallows fly in search of insects. “The windshield of the car stays much cleaner, even on a long journey. “

Christian Buder sees the exhibition in the local museum as a good opportunity to draw attention to the work of the beekeepers’ association and perhaps also to attract new people interested in the work of the beekeeper. “Since we don’t have a high school in Neschwitz, recruiting young talent is difficult. Primary school students are still too young,” he says.

Neschwitzer Heimatmuseum offers other exhibitions

For the 16th Day of the Neschwitz Museum, which takes place on May 22 from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., the beekeepers’ association wishes to have its own stand.

Dieter Petschel is also pleased to be able to present another interesting special exhibition in the halls of the local history museum in Neschwitz. The president of the Kultur- und Heimatfreunde Neschwitz association and his comrades in arms have created a small but beautiful museum in the former Spar supermarket, whose offer goes far beyond a village folklore fair.

Arnd Lehmann, director of the museum, Christian Buder, president of the beekeepers' association, and Dieter Petschel, president of the association of friends of culture and homeland.  (left to right) rejoicing at the joint special exhibition at the local history museum in Neschwitz.

Arnd Lehmann, director of the museum, Christian Buder, president of the beekeepers’ association, and Dieter Petschel, president of the association of friends of culture and homeland. (left to right) rejoicing at the special joint exhibition at the local history museum in Neschwitz.
© Uwe Menschner

A collection of rocks and minerals also provides interesting information about the geological past of the region around Neschwitz, which once stood on the Elbe.

In addition, the association also “plays” in the small gallery of the baroque castle, where an exhibition by the artist Bautzen Andreas Rochor is currently being shown, and coordinates the reconstruction of the executioner’s house in Lissahora on the site of the windmill of Luga.

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